Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23
significance in the 19th century america. >> and the most famous today's mitt romney. does the romney family have interaction with the brigham young plan? >> i'm sure there are many descendants that know each other. the church is still a fairly tight knit institution and especially in utah it means a lot if you have ancestors that go way back to the pioneer era of the church. >> romney does as well. >> why did the family in that in mexico at one part? >> wealthy ended up in mexico because i believe mitt romney's great grandfather practiced marriage, she was a polygamist and later a part in the 1800's case serious effort to incarcerate more men men who produce polygamy and they went to mexico to escape persecution and i'm not an expert on the family history, but i believe mitt romney's great grandfather was among them. >> the wait until he had died before the out of the polygamists? >> it was out what putative is essentially made a federal crime in 1862. but the u.s. government doesn't really have the wherewithal to prosecute it until the 1880s and that happens to be after brigham young's dea
. hello. spent nice to meet you. >> gary johnson? no, no, no, no. you've got to be a romney girl now. >> how are you? good to see you. >> my own newspaper held me over and i was explaining, it's rude to lose your watch in the middle of an interview. it's like a half hour later. spent do you know brian? >> i haven't seen in such a long time. why wouldn't you have me on? we are? that's great, that's great because i will be in new york for that. hello. i will see you later. that was good. do you know who it is dedicated to? >> no. >> it's a crackerjack surprise inside. has your husband read it yet? spent he's busy. leave him alone. >> he changed his e-mail address on the, by the way. spent i don't know what your e-mail is. >> both of you change your e-mail address on it. i hadn't planned to say anything but since i'm late, my publisher, editor at eagle told me it would be polite for me to say something. so i just want to for startup i think it's all human events fault that i was late. that's the most important thing. it's not my fault. and thank you so much for all come tonight. sensual
was really about. this pregnancy reagan as honorary chair, that george romney, mitt romney had as the chair of job core. used to bring george foreman the proxy. i have a few i remember george foreman, 63 african-american to have his on-the-job quarter -- orrin hatch, republican senator. orrin hatch and went to george foreman on the other and he loved it because it black and white, democrat, i'm talking about dropping kids out of school so they can get skills. mitt romney's father, george romney was the honorary chair to america, which unfortunately governor romney said he's going to hear about. so you wanted to work with republicans and democrats and wanted to do it because it's his faith and he think the concept were talking about faith, but that we talk about it in inclusively that brings us all together and it separates us. so that maybe it. 20 thank you for coming out. i know it's very seen people go out into different things on date. either way, sean duffy is buying drinks. i hope you all enjoy. thank you very much. [applause] >> "500 days: secrets and lies in the terror wars" is the n
implications of the romney administration on the issues of cyberwar and detention policy. and understanding romney's position -- >> i will offer some thoughts on that. i do know some of the people who are likely to end up in a romney administration on cyberissues. one of the advantages is you can -- you learn stuff, you are basically as henry kissinger said you are spending the stuff you use janelle and when that is gone so should you be. you come out and people tell you things that might be true as opposed to things they want you to believe and get the decision they want. they have come to a real appreciation of water remarkably penetrated country we have on the basis of cyberespionage and cyberattacks. and a more aggressive approach to this, and governor romney's statement labeling china a currency manipulator on day 1 suggests taking a tougher alignment with china may be an issue, is worth pursuing. we will see not an enormous change but probably a check up in preparation and confrontation, oversight. >> anyone else? >> i suspect on detention policy we won't see a lot of change. we did n
every year federally than we bring in. my question is, let's say by some miracle romney actually wins the election. will there be the political will to come by nation effectively reduce spending and raise taxes to the point we can effectively reduce that, and that's in light of historically low interest rates, that, you know, at some point are going to go up, and china's going to realize our debt's no good. i'd be interested in each of the panelists' comment. >> quickly, is there political will? >> i think the answer is, yes. right now as kevin mentioned, we have the highest corporate tax rate in the oecd, 35%. president obama and governor mitt romney have both come out advocating for reduction of the corporate rate to something that starts with a 2. president obama says 28, mitt romney says 25. if lowering marginal tax rates is good for corporations because of the incentive effect, aren't they good for individuals because of the incentive effect? because there's a commonality on the corporate rate, we might see something happen in 2013 regardless of who's elected. that's a wedge to s
and i think romney will win the election. i think he will push these things democrats support. one of the things we have not is in terms of entitlements, there's this attitude that we must raise the retirement age to 85 and shoot grandma so she doesn't take any more medicare or something like that. they're very positive reforms. i mentioned the cell phones. i can't link it to the same creativity and health care are you create more health care, cheaper health care and a safety net is said of the crazy system we have today? government is friendly aquaculture. but we don't be starving. in terms of food, so with that agriculture produce the food. companies processed the food, everyone from casinos and restaurants and supermarkets and grocery stores of food. people have problems from food banks to food stamps to do with it. why can't we do the same thing in health care? said people get basics and get real free markets. i live in new jersey. you've really got me going on this. in new jersey, with crazy regulations. i can buy perfectly good health insurance policy in pennsylvania and half
for mitt romney. he traveled all over the country. it was a terrific way to introduce him to people outside of florida. even though he's very popular in florida and had a stunning victory in the 2010 senate race -- not a win that a lot of people expected him to get when that race started, you know, he was facing this very tough candidate, charlie crist, who was a popular governor at the time -- but outside of florida his profile was much smaller. and now he's been introduced to people in all sorts of key places like iowa and north carolina -- >> host: was just there. >> guest: -- and all of these other swing states. >> host: so when it comes to marco rubio as a presidential candidate, is he going to run in 2016? >> guest: well, nobody tells you at in this stage of the game that they are running. but if you want to look for some clues, on the weekend of the book festival he finds himself on saturday night in iowa. hmm. one could draw a conclusion from that possibly. clearly, he's on the short list of people that republicans are excited about, and clearly he's ambitious. there's no question t
was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was george romney whose son has been in the news lately. mitt romney's dad complained ray was not being cooperative. he felt he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might have used fannie mae posted your letter head to raise money for democratic candidates and the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all the fannie mae work related to foreclosures, all the fees. in nine months of taking office nixon hired him -- fired him without giving any public explanation. lapin resisted, said that nixon was turning fannie mae and to what he called a patronage putting. lapin tried to get a restraining order from a federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. beret kept showing up for work anyway. at one point of the lights went out at fannie may's offices and the phone lines went dead. some people at fannie mae interpreted this as a subtle message from the nixon white house. finally gave up and walked away. nixon appointed a new
just heard a newsletter, which said the r. word is not romney, it is republican. this is about a party that is still to become a modern, effective party. part of the answer is suggested the republican national committee works to create a set of debates hosted by the republicans do we tell the media, why would you want -- i participated in the head every time here at the reagan library, but the truth is you ended up in the reagan library with one of the examples. left-wing moderators did their centrist because everybody they know us to their left. [laughter] these are not people who are biased. they represent the center for america because every round they go to cocktail parties at this literally got far to the left. so if you were to go back and analyze questions were putting together right now fascinating case study, which some of you will remember richard stephanopoulos asked this question about the 1963 tidwell versus connecticut supreme court suit involving contraception. i guarantee you, because i was there. every republican candidate and a debate has gone what? relearned a few we
of competitiveness. but one of the things that i did when i was working with the state, i was part of the romney administration as secretary of economic development was understand that boston is doing tremendously well economically, but if we wanted to turn around, um, the pioneer valley or southeastern massachusetts, we had to turn around the fates of new bedford and fall river and lowell and lawrence. and in order to do that, it wasn't plopping down a single courthouse. that wasn't going to fix it. >> that's right. >> it wasn't going to be building a new walled convention center that had its back to the city, that the only way you can transform a city is with a strategy that builds on the city's assets, that tightly weaves people together around our educational assets, our human as is sets, our community-based organizations, our old industrial assets and some of the new skills that are spinning off of them. and until you knit those pieces together and confine the new narrative lines that come out of that, you know, that the old, that this is a providence and fall river example, the old jewelry
romney. was he extremely filtered? >> guest: unfiltered without a doubt. in historical is not a lot of time in politics. had he won the presidency, he would've been second second only to wilson and arguably grover cleveland in terms of the shortness of his political career before he became president. >> host: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was, but tv signature programs in which authors are interviewed by policymakers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" errors at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> historian harlow giles unger recounts the life of the six president, john quincy adams who died in 1840. quincy adams, second president had a long career, which aside from his presidency 10 years as secretary of state, senator, congressman administered six countries. th
speaking to us today. do you know this fellow romney? [laughter] what you know about romney? have you met him? well, i'm still asking these questions all these years later. [laughter] [applause] we have a tough job up here tonight. the kind time the presses in on us tonight. i will be the best to be the kind of aggressive moderator that you may not have seen on television. [laughter] [applause] last night, in fact. [laughter] [applause] we are going to introduce this fascinating collection of more than 245 hours of tapes plus 17 hours of did the bulls and telephone conversations. then we will play some. we will play some of them briefly, and we won't have time to discuss them in depth, but we will have time to have a little discussion after each day. with that, let's get started. mr. putman, set the scene. how long has the library and in possession of these? how did this happen? and what was done -- describe the process we have done to prepare them for the public use? >> well, let me violate your first rule right away. i also want to thank caroline kennedy for all of the initiatives that
romney the other night without a speech. so i want to say first that it's such an honor to have been able to be in the same room last night with the finalist who don't need to tell them what extraordinary company they are. this book was done as a labor of love for my husband, who brought me in as a writer, brought me into a rope that i didn't know and made me believe that the stories there could be told. but the work itself was the product of some extraordinary women. it was who believed in me in this book and gave of their time to do it and that is kate medina and london king and all of these ferocious women at random house. i am grateful to them. [applause] i also have to say that this book would not be possible without two other extraordinary women. they are my translators for this project and they risked more than i did to tell the stories. finally, i'm grateful to the courage of the people who allow their stories to be told. if this means anything, i think it's this. that small stories in so-called places matter and one of the reasons that they matter i think is because, because they
it a race riot, racist riot occurring by the -- well, it was not that. anti-obama students, pro-romney students came out onto the campus and demonstrated. the right, they can do that against the results of the election, and a handful of students were screaming out racial slurs. putting that in context, then the next day three times that amount of people showed up for a candlelighter is mopeny protesting the -- ceremony, protesting the incident the night before. so mississippi was, mississippi is. it's moving on. but, yes, you're right. there's more and more that should come out and talk about it. so you can get a balanced picture that their view of the south may not be the correct view today. it's not just a bunch of rioters throwing bricks. thank you. john. >> henry, can you talk a little more about the special security detail that you had following, you know, your initial -- >> sure. >> -- and how were, i assume you were just chosen for that, but was there -- do you know why you were chosen for that? >> well, i'd gone through the -- >> how did it end? >> yeah, yeah, thank you. i was
. mitt romney saying he a sinuous anti-semite between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it is a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel had our great country. it's almost a mystical relationship when he think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it is due to the fact that this is not just a jewish support. barely 2% of the population united states. it is because we have shared values, shared enemies and islamic terrorism that many people in the united states viewed israel as the holy land. not just jews, but not jews as well. it's a remarkable time when there's so much polarization between republicans and democrats. it's one of the few foreign-policy issues that actually unite democrats and republicans. >> "the future of the jews." is your book title provocative in any way and do you mean it to be? >> i mean it to be because 10 people who survived calamities for 3000 years in effect except successful integration? and how do you react
, but the answer that both romney and obama gave was no. no military involvement. the no-fly zone is a stab toward military involvement, but not a full military environment. what would be your answer to a question? >> frankly, this is part -- some of the calculation that went into the intervention in libya was that if we intervene in the rea to libya they're already done this. it makes things -- that's a little bit too flippant. personally if i were in that position i would be in favor of a no-fly zone. i think so with the turks. look, you're doing the same thing. you are repeating history over and over again. and what i think is problematic is sending a certain caliber weapons top position which we don't know exactly who they are. that's also repeating a bad precedent. you don't want those weapons that to fall into the wrong hands. what happens to the 20,000 surface-to-air missiles that were supposedly communal, and -- the exit, the whole other answer to that, but yes. i would think that if you're going to follow that rationale, you know, ultimately the debt would make sense. safe havens. >> i wo
and not just between him and bent romney but a choice between the ideology and different approaches to government and different sets of divisions and values and everything he did in that timeframe he kept trying to tethered to this big idea and when i wrote to the book of course we didn't know how things would end up on november 6, 2012, but i looked at how she developed the governing strategy, and they're really culminated in november, so this is the back story to what happened in this presidential campaign. >> david korn, showdown is the most recent book and we are here at the national press club. >>> robert discusses the role that geography has played in shaping the defense and talks about the role that it plays in the future. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the s
enthusiasm level for mid-run as a candidate? >> well, i think -- mitt romney as a candidate. >> i think he's going to be a very good president. i think he gets it, and i think he is moving forward, and they think he is saying some things that we need to hear. >> you mentioned a new book coming out. what was the title of the? >> the new book coming out is freedom manifesto, why free markets are moral and big government isn't spent that's another book written by you and steve forbes? >> yes, it is. >> we've got it over here. >> it's a little card. >> you've got your back over there. we want to show you the current book while she fishes that out. "how capitalism will save us," and here is the new book by elizabeth ames and steve forbes, freedom manifesto, and the subtitle is -- >> why free markets are moral and big government isn't. spent why is it big government moral? >> because big government makes decisions and takes action based on political agendas, based on selfish political agendas but it's about meeting its own political selfish needs, and free markets are meeting the real-world need
an affluent dad like bill gates does, like mitt romney does, but still think of yourself as self-made because you didn't inherit the business that made you a multimillionaire from your dad. and that's particularly important playing into how they think of themselves in the world. it's important right now for these guys to be really numerate. one of the things i found really interesting and quite sort of international is this is really the age of mastery of numbers. and my favorite example of this, you know, we're kind of -- that seems to make sense when you think of the silicon valley guys or the wall street guys, but i'll bet you if you sort of in your mind's eye are imagining the russian oligarchs, you know, you think a guy in some fancy italian suit with a mole on one side and guys with guns on the other side, and this is true. [laughter] but he also probably has a ph.d. in math or physics, you know? even those guys. and this is true also of the chinese, of the indians. it's also a really, really global group. and this is another key characteristic, something which is quite different from p
views are changing in part because of mitt romney's candidacy. the huge mainstreaming of mormons in america. i have a number of stories in this book about relationships that evangelicals are building with muslims. we talk a lot about my friend, reverend bob roberts, a southern baptist preacher who during the ground zero time, they win on went out on a limb with how supportive they were. bob roberts in deep red texas started reading matt 10 things i love about muslims. ten things i admire about islam. and i thought, why are you doing this? and he said, i am a christian, as is what i have to do. you people are in trouble, and i have to stand up for you. so i find that wonderful and he built a civic bridge with me, based on the inspiration of this tradition. that kind of stuff is going on a little bit below the radar screen. a little bit behind the scenes in both campaigns. i think it is a broadly positive thing for america. >> what you think is the biggest roadblock that your organization or interface groups are facing today? what do you think are one or two things that people can
debate in the subsequent again romney versus obama? >> i don't think science ever plays a larger role and for me that is unfortunate. dividing that al gore would have been a better president? no. someone who routinely exaggerate some of science offends me as a scientist because that isn't what scientists are supposed to be. it can be a truth regularly took information and what we would stretch it to the point of lowercase its still scientifically somewhat accurate who and it's really stretching it here and he did that over and over and over again. his 25 rise in the sea level is assuming the dreamland ice sheet melts and no one knows if that is going to happen or not there's a lot of melting the summer, you know the arctic didn't have much ice at all so this is a problem but it isn't useful to exaggerate which is what he regular leaded and when you are caught exaggerating the problem use the credibility and the science loses credibility, so no i don't think al gore would have been a letter spokesman because i don't think he did a good job at all in the field. >> i actually was here in
in america. evangelical views of mormons are changing in part because of mitt romney's candidacy. a huge mainstreaming of mormons in america. i have a number of stores in this book actually about relationships that evangelicals are building with muslims. and talk a lot about my friend, southern baptist preacher in texas who, during the ground zero mosque crisis, i thought that jon stewart and nick kristof went off on a limb with how supportive they were of muslims, but bob roberts in deep red texas started tweeting 10 things i love about muslims. 10 things i admire it about islam. and i'm like, why are you doing this? he's like, i'm a christian come this is what i got to do. your people are in trouble and i've got to stand up for you. so i find a, i disagree with bob on just about everything, but he built a civic bridge with me based on the aspiration of his tradition. and i kind of stuff i think again is going on a little bit below the radar screen, although the behind the scenes in both campaigns, and i think it's a broadly positive thing for america. >> what do you think is the bigges
toss. do we like mr. romney, mr. obama, prefer the republicans and the democrats. for the mass of people sent the system cannot be debated because everyone agrees, then we focus elsewhere on things like whether you can have a gun in the back of your truck or whether you can approve of being marriage or a whole host of other issues whose importance on not disputing, but are issues that get us away from this thorny problem of how the economics and politics are articulated where they're is a desire of those who run the society that that simply be ruled out of order. >> the corporations that dominate what most people in this country see here, perfecting the art of propaganda and manufacturing consent well simultaneously criminalizing dissent. i want you to talk about the very origins of this which could be traced to the much revered and in my view much overrated founding fathers, the political rally. people talk about them in hushed tones. let's hear what they have to say about these kinds of issues. james madison who wrote with hamilton the federalist papers, principal writing of
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)